Psychology Coaching: a Growing Psychological Career? How a Coach Can Beat The Pants Off The Average Head Shrink

Think That Coaching Isn’t a Psychological Career?

Psychology coaching is a real profession, and a valid psychological career.  I’d like to come out of the closet right now.  I’m a psychology coaching expert.  I’ve never taken or completed a course in psychology, and never been certified as a counselor, but I still believe that I work in an industry made up of one psychological career after another.

As coaches, we get a bad wrap in many ways, but we have really turned the world on its head when it comes to one thing:  Beating the psychotherapists at their own game.  We have become the most respected community of people working in a psychological career to turn many psychological problems around within extremely short periods of time, without the use of drugs.  Can your average head shrink say that?

NOPE

So how do a rag-tag band of pseudo-psychology coaching professionals produce results that most in a psychological career can’t do after 8 years of schooling?  We use a few simple techniques that, when mastered, are extremely effective.

Psychology Coaching: Get Past The Lies That Most in a Psychological Career Put up With

Most therapists and head shrinks (and others in a psychological career) would allow their clients / patients to lie right to their face.  If you diagnose someone as a ‘crazy person’ wouldn’t you just “understand” whatever they threw at you?  Those of us in the psychology coaching profession don’t label people like that, so we expect even the ‘craziest’ people to shoot straight and tell the truth.

Are Most People in a Psychological Career Too Lazy to Get Past The Lies?

Why is this ‘Truth Therapy’ so effective?  Because 90% of the time, the reason why someone is limited or is feeling lousy in the first place is because they are lying to themselves, lying to other people, or simply ‘omitting / ignoring’ the truth (i.e. lying!).  If you do nothing but expect the truth from your clients, you will be more successful in helping them than 90% of those in a psychological career.

Psychology Coaching Elegance:  Balancing The Truth With Sensitive Optimism in Your Psychological Career

If all that I did in psychology coaching was just push the truth out of people, it wouldn’t be that effective (although it would still be more effective than most others that work in a psychological career).

After you bludgeon your coaching clients with the truth, you’ve got to have a heart.  You’ve got to be sensitive to WHY they lied to themselves (or you, or others, etc.) and help them to transition to telling the truth in a way they can deal with.  Eventually the truth can set them free, but your job as a psychology coaching professional is to help them to feel good about the truth, as well as to take on the power to change what they can to create an even ‘better truth’.  You’ve got to supply the optimism for your client to do that.

Psychology Coaching Comes Out of The Closet as a Highly Respected Psychological Career

As psychology coaching has grown, we’ve gotten more and more respect as a psychological career.  More therapists, counselors, and psychologist are becoming psychology coaches because it’s a good career move, a respected profession, and actually a better experience and more valuable service to the client.  Let the psychology coaching profession ‘come out of the closet’ and take its place among the most highly recognized and respected psychological careers.

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  1. Daniel says

    Help me understand this one. So you think that it’s better to not get formally educated, trained, supervised, and have one’s background checked? As Seth Myers would say, REALLY? You don’t think it’s important to understand psychological disorders and their place in treatment? REALLY? You think it’s better to present oneself as a coach without understanding suicidal ideation, domestic violence, and child abuse? REALLY? REALLY? And it’s better to go with a coach not who rises above the competition based on their intellectual merits but rather someone who is a skilled marketer and salesperson and pay for a short term training “certificate”? really? And you would prefer to (all thing being equal) get life advice from someone who pursued short term gratification and money over long term skills and pursuing what is in the best interest of their clients first? You think that it’s best to ignore the thousands of highly trained specialists, doctors, professors, and all the articles and textbooks and research they have conducted? Really? Really?

  2. Jeffrey T. Sooey says

    Research is fine. Nothing wrong with it. BUT… research doesn’t produce results. Let’s take each of your points one by one and cover FACT (rather than opinion):

    1. << Get formally educated, trained, supervised, and have one’s background checked?>>

    What’s so great about formalities? Can’t you be responsible for your own expertise rather than depending on mommy and daddy to teach you? Think for yourself much? I suppose for many people that don’t have it in them to do their own work… they need this type of motivation to learn. I guess there’s nothing wrong with it, but there’s a problem with formal education which is that sometimes you’ll be formally educated about thins that are either WRONG, INCONSEQUENTIAL, or DAMAGING to your client (and there are a whole laundry list of these things in the psychological professions… sorry, but that’s a FACT).

    2. <<You don’t think it’s important to understand psychological disorders and their place in treatment? >>

    (See answer to #1)

  3. Jeffrey T. Sooey says

    3. <<You think it’s better to present oneself as a coach without understanding suicidal ideation, domestic violence, and child abuse? >>

    If you mean ‘understand’ by saying that you ‘took a class on it and you agree with all your professors who never REALLY helped anyone’, then… YES, I’d rather NOT ‘understand’. Most in the ‘profession’ ‘understand’ well enough to sit on their collective asses and explain why they are so ineffective in helping people. Most of the time, these ‘understandings’ sound like excuses to me more than real, valuable information. If that’s your version of ‘learning’, then no thanks, I’ll stay ‘ignorant’.

    Again, to be fair, there are many ‘understandings’ in the psychological professions that are valuable. I suppose if you have a good head on your shoulders and you are able to pick and choose then it’s all fine and good, but it’s certainly not needed to be quite effective with helping to change peoples lives for the better, and in my experience, it’s a way to more often ‘rest on your laurels’ and be a bit lazy about actually doing some real good in peoples lives (i.e. it becomes more about writing your next research paper so you can get the love of your professional community rather than helping someone that really could use it. I have a problem with that.)

  4. Jeffrey T. Sooey says

    4. <<And it’s better to go with a coach not who rises above the competition based on their intellectual merits…>>

    If all you have going for you in trying to help people is intellect, then you’re USELESS. Intellectual knowledge and $3.75 will get you a cup of coffee at Starbucks. (another little FACT for you)

    5. <<rather someone who is a skilled marketer and salesperson and pay for a short term training “certificate”?>>

    This is probably your only valid point (I think). Most ‘coaches’ who become successful have only small amounts of training, and supply certificates rather than a real education that would have been valuable for them. I think my argument is that formal education is not the only choice and many times it’s not the best or most effective choice. I’m not at all ‘for’ just being a marketer or salesperson (although you need those skills as well to reach more people and make a difference there)

  5. Jeffrey T. Sooey says

    6. <<And you would prefer to (all thing being equal) get life advice from someone who pursued short term gratification and money over long term skills and pursuing what is in the best interest of their clients first?>>

    I’ll take advice from the person that can help ME the most… I think you are connecting that people who pursue formalized education ‘really care about their clients’ where those that pursued alternative means for their people helping skills ‘don’t care… and only care about money’ (which I’m sure is true sometimes, but couldn’t be further from the truth in many, and in perhaps MOST of the situations).

    My other response to this is that ‘long term skills’ aren’t learned in a school… they are learned in the field, working with clients and making a real, measurable difference… which is what coaches are well known for (and many people with advanced degrees may or may not be known for). I think a COMBINATION of education and experiential learning is the best thing, rather than no experience and all education. The FACT is that real life experience produces a MUCH more skilled practitioner than sitting in a classroom.

    You STILL have to have the facts and a certain modicum of knowledge… Of course KNOWLEDGE IS POWER… but KNOWLEDGE ALONE is NOT POWERFUL AT ALL… and I think this is where ‘higher education’ get’s it wrong. I think that ‘they’ believe that all you need is the knowledge and then you’re ready to change the world… NO, YOU’RE NOT.

  6. Jeffrey T. Sooey says

    7. <<You think that it’s best to ignore the thousands of highly trained specialists, doctors, professors, and all the articles and textbooks and research they have conducted?>>

    hey… I never said to IGNORE it. I would, however warn anyone not to get DRUNK on it. Trusting yourself, practicing with clients, seeing what TRULY works and doesn’t work, to a certain extent, is just as important as reams of research.

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